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Types of Concrete Foundations


By ProMatcher Staff



House Foundation Types

The type of house foundation required for your project will depend on where you live, the soil conditions in your area, and the type of house you are building.

There are three basic types of house foundations.

1. Slab-on-grade foundations
2. Basement foundations
3. Crawl space foundations

Slab-on-grade Foundations

A slab-on-grade foundation is constructed by pouring a layer of concrete on a compacted base. If the soil alone cannot support the weight of the slab, a layer of crushed stone can be laid as a subbase. Slab foundations are practical and budget-friendly. They are relatively easy to build, but precautions should be taken to prevent water from seeping into the foundation. The soil should be graded properly and gutters and downspouts should always be kept clean.

Slab foundations are most popular in the southern U.S. where soil conditions generally prevent the construction of basements.

Basement Foundations

With a basement foundation, the basement walls serves as the foundation. Constructing a basement typically requires more excavation because the foundation is underground. The basement walls can be made of several different materials, including 1) concrete blocks, 2) poured concrete, or 3) bricks.

Basement foundations are popular along the east coast of the United States. A basement can provide additional living space or it can be used for storage. However, because the foundation is underground, extra precautions should be taken to prevent water from entering the basement.

Crawl space Foundations

Crawl space foundations are popular in the middle of the country. These home foundations are constructed about two feet off the ground as a result of shallower frost lines. The space between the ground and the foundation floor becomes the crawl space. This area often houses the building’s ductwork, electrical wiring, and plumbing.

Building a crawl space requires much less excavation than building a basement. As a result, crawl space foundations are typically more affordable. Also, the area between the ground and the foundation provides extra protection against termites, wet soil, and flooding.




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About the Author

ProMatcher Staff, ProMatcher
Orlando, FL 32803

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